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Volume 23, Supplement—December 2017
SUPPLEMENT ISSUE
Global Health Security Supplement
Prevent

Use of a Diagonal Approach to Health System Strengthening and Measles Elimination after a Large Nationwide Outbreak in Mongolia

José E. HaganComments to Author , Ashley L. Greiner, Ulzii-Orshikh Luvsansharav, Jason Lake, Christopher Lee, Roberta Pastore, Yoshihiro Takashima, Amarzaya Sarankhuu, Sodbayar Demberelsuren, Rachel Smith, Benjamin Park, and James L. Goodson
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (J.E. Hagan, A. Greiner, U.-O. Luvsansharav, J. Lake, C. Lee, R. Smith, B. Park, J.L. Goodson); World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Manila, the Philippines (R. Pastore, Y. Takashima); Ministry of Health and Sports, Ulaanbaatar (A. Sarankhuu); World Health Organization Mongolia Country Office, Ulaanbaatar (S. Demberelsuren)

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Figure 2

Flowcharts for organization of the Incident Management System in Mongolia during (A) and after (B) the 2015–2016 measles outbreak. Restructuring of the system after the outbreak was designed to better align with World Health Organization recommendations (28). Note that this figure does not represent a complete Incident Management System, only a restructuring of the existing system.

Figure 2. Flowcharts for organization of the Incident Management System in Mongolia during (A) and after (B) the 2015–2016 measles outbreak. Restructuring of the system after the outbreak was designed to better align with World Health Organization recommendations (28). Note that this figure does not represent a complete Incident Management System, only a restructuring of the existing system.

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Page created: November 20, 2017
Page updated: November 20, 2017
Page reviewed: November 20, 2017
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
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